Looking for something to do with friends?

Here’s an idea for your next Round Up Club play day or Pony Club meetup.

Forgot your saddle?

Forget your riding boots, but you still want to play with your horses?

Not enough time to ride both horses, but you still want to give them their exercise?

Try standing astride two horses and doing drill team work like in this German Quadrille.

Here the Germans are showing us a fun way to do a quadrille.

Lederhosen are optional.

Oh what fun!

This video appeared on Michael Matson’s profile page on Barnmice.

Looking for a perfect property in Oklahoma on which to ride your horse? I can help you find the hills and the trees.

You’re on your own to find the horse!

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Are you looking for a horse property with a spring or creek that would be perfect venue for the cross country leg of a three day event?

Check out these Northeast Oklahoma properties with creeks or springs:

See all Properties with a Spring or Creek.
(all data current as of 4/24/2014)

  1. 3 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 2,516 sq ft
    Lot size: 113.00 ac
    Year built: 1994
    Parking spots: 1
    Days on market: 2
  2. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,680 sq ft
    Lot size: 1.04 ac
    Year built: 2007
    Days on market: 2
  3. 5 beds, 3 full, 1 part baths
    Home size: 3,471 sq ft
    Lot size: 50.96 ac
    Year built: 1978
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 3
  4. 5 beds, 4 full, 1 part baths
    Home size: 4,569 sq ft
    Lot size: 103.00 ac
    Year built: 2002
    Parking spots: 3
    Days on market: 4
  5. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 3,400 sq ft
    Lot size: 40.00 ac
    Year built: 1981
    Days on market: 4
  6. 4 beds, 3 full, 1 part baths
    Home size: 3,301 sq ft
    Lot size: 10,323 sqft
    Year built: 1997
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 4
  7. 5 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 2,014 sq ft
    Lot size: 25.81 ac
    Year built: 2004
    Days on market: 7
  8. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 2,611 sq ft
    Lot size: 15.00 ac
    Year built: 1980
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 7
  9. 5 beds, 4 full, 2 part baths
    Home size: 7,980 sq ft
    Lot size: 1.91 ac
    Year built: 1995
    Parking spots: 4
    Days on market: 7
  10. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,484 sq ft
    Lot size: 43,560 sqft
    Year built: 1975
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 7

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

Shortlink: http://oklahomahorseproperties.com/?p=1442

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Copyright© 2013 by Debbie Solano — ALL RIGHTS RESERVED — Oklahoma Horse Properties — German Quadrille

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This year’s Rolex Kentucky Three Day Event is going on now: April 25-28, 2013. Tickets can be purchased at the gate.

If you cannot get to Louisville in time, just imagine you are there.

Take a break from looking at Oklahoma horse properties and watch this video.

Obviously this video has absolutely nothing to do with finding a great horse property in or around Tulsa, Oklahoma.

If you are intereted in attending this year’s Rolex Kentucky Three Day Event, three day event, go to their website.

Oh what fun! These riders are really great!

Looking for a perfect property in Oklahoma on which to ride your horse? I can help you find the hills and the trees.

You’re on your own to find the horse!

_____________________________________________________________________

Are you looking for a horse property with a spring or creek that would be perfect venue for the cross country leg of a three day event?

Check out these Northeast Oklahoma properties with creeks or springs:

See all Properties with a Spring or Creek.
(all data current as of 4/24/2014)

  1. 3 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 2,516 sq ft
    Lot size: 113.00 ac
    Year built: 1994
    Parking spots: 1
    Days on market: 2
  2. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,680 sq ft
    Lot size: 1.04 ac
    Year built: 2007
    Days on market: 2
  3. 5 beds, 3 full, 1 part baths
    Home size: 3,471 sq ft
    Lot size: 50.96 ac
    Year built: 1978
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 3
  4. 5 beds, 4 full, 1 part baths
    Home size: 4,569 sq ft
    Lot size: 103.00 ac
    Year built: 2002
    Parking spots: 3
    Days on market: 4
  5. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 3,400 sq ft
    Lot size: 40.00 ac
    Year built: 1981
    Days on market: 4
  6. 4 beds, 3 full, 1 part baths
    Home size: 3,301 sq ft
    Lot size: 10,323 sqft
    Year built: 1997
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 4
  7. 5 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 2,014 sq ft
    Lot size: 25.81 ac
    Year built: 2004
    Days on market: 7
  8. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 2,611 sq ft
    Lot size: 15.00 ac
    Year built: 1980
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 7
  9. 5 beds, 4 full, 2 part baths
    Home size: 7,980 sq ft
    Lot size: 1.91 ac
    Year built: 1995
    Parking spots: 4
    Days on market: 7
  10. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,484 sq ft
    Lot size: 43,560 sqft
    Year built: 1975
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 7

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

Whatever equine discipline you enjoy, there’s a place just right for you and your horse in and around Tulsa, Oklahoma.

If you own a ranch or a horse farm near Tulsa and are interested in moving elsewhere or moving to midtown Tulsa or even hanging up your spurs, please call me. I’d love to position your Tulsa area horse property in both the Tulsa real estate market and in the Grand Lake real estate market.

Call or text Debbie Solano at 918-724-8201.

Shortlink: http://oklahomahorseproperties.com/?p=1381

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Copyright© 2013 by Debbie Solano — ALL RIGHTS RESERVED — Oklahoma Horse Properties — 2012 Rolex Kentucky Three Day Event

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Why Do You Need Flood Insurance?

According to Edward L. Connor, Deputy Administrator, Insurance, for the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration, “Floods can bring, mud trash and, if you don’t have flood insurance, debt.”

If your home floods, you will incur debt to recover after a devastating flood. Many people do not have enough in their savings accounts to pay the costs of recovering from a flood.

According to FEMA, “Over the past five years, the average paid claim for flood damage was $33,790.”

Your Mortgage Lender May Require You to Get Flood Insurance if Your Home is in the 100-Year Flood Plain

In order to pay for all the claims, FEMA has conveniently almost tripled the width of the flood plain, so that if you didn’t think you needed flood insurance in years gone by, you will be convinced by your mortgage lender that you need flood insurance now.

So rather than making the choice to get flood insurance, the federal government, along with the insurance industry has made it easy to decide. Flood insurance may be mandatory when a structure is in the flood plain.

Federal law requires people who own homes with a mortgage through a federally regulated and insured lender to carry flood insurance.

In short, if you have a mortgage loan and are now in a flood plain, you must carry flood insurance or your mortgage note is immediately due and payable. No kidding!

Even if you have lived in your home for sixty years and it has never flooded, you may have to carry flood insurance if you have a mortgage.

Your premium payments will help the federal government assist others who actually do get flooded out from time to time or once in a blue moon.

By purchasing flood insurance, you are not only protecting the home you love from the remote possibility of being devastated by a few inches of floodwater, but you are helping your neighbors in New York, New Jersey, Iowa, and Louisiana.

By purchasing flood insurance, you are being a good citizen as well as protecting your savings account from potential catastrophic losses.

You No Longer Have the Choice if You are In a High Risk Area

So even if you live on the edge of a high risk area, where you only have a one in four chance of flooding during the course of a 30-year mortgage, you no longer have the choice. You have to get flood insurance.

Admittedly, without flood insurance, recovery costs must come out of your own pocket. Why save for the eventuality when you can purchase insurance for much more money and never have to worry about managing your own savings. Just wait and see if you experience a flood and wait for FEMA to help you out.

That’s why you need flood insurance. Don’t you feel so much more secure in knowing that the federal government can better handle your money than you can? Just trust the National Flood Insurance Program.

If you don’t believe me and want to learn more about flood risk and flood insurance, go to Floodsmart.gov/highrisknow. To find agents in your area, call 1-888-724-6975.

_____________________________________________________________________

Are you looking for a horse property with a spring or creek?

Check out these properties with creeks or springs:

See all Properties with a Spring or Creek.
(all data current as of 4/24/2014)

  1. 3 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 2,516 sq ft
    Lot size: 113.00 ac
    Year built: 1994
    Parking spots: 1
    Days on market: 2
  2. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,680 sq ft
    Lot size: 1.04 ac
    Year built: 2007
    Days on market: 2
  3. 5 beds, 3 full, 1 part baths
    Home size: 3,471 sq ft
    Lot size: 50.96 ac
    Year built: 1978
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 3
  4. 5 beds, 4 full, 1 part baths
    Home size: 4,569 sq ft
    Lot size: 103.00 ac
    Year built: 2002
    Parking spots: 3
    Days on market: 4
  5. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 3,400 sq ft
    Lot size: 40.00 ac
    Year built: 1981
    Days on market: 4
  6. 4 beds, 3 full, 1 part baths
    Home size: 3,301 sq ft
    Lot size: 10,323 sqft
    Year built: 1997
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 4
  7. 5 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 2,014 sq ft
    Lot size: 25.81 ac
    Year built: 2004
    Days on market: 7
  8. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 2,611 sq ft
    Lot size: 15.00 ac
    Year built: 1980
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 7
  9. 5 beds, 4 full, 2 part baths
    Home size: 7,980 sq ft
    Lot size: 1.91 ac
    Year built: 1995
    Parking spots: 4
    Days on market: 7
  10. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,484 sq ft
    Lot size: 43,560 sqft
    Year built: 1975
    Parking spots: 2
    Days on market: 7

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

Whatever equine discipline you enjoy, there’s a place just right for you and your horse in and around Tulsa, Oklahoma.

If you own a ranch or a horse farm near Tulsa and are interested in moving elsewhere or moving to midtown Tulsa or even hanging up your spurs, please call me. I’d love to position your Tulsa area horse property in both the Tulsa real estate market and in the Grand Lake real estate market.

Call or text Debbie Solano at 918-724-8201.

Shortlink: http://oklahomahorseproperties.com/?p=1343

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Copyright© 2013 by Debbie Solano — ALL RIGHTS RESERVED — Oklahoma Horse Properties — Why Do You Need Flood Insurance?

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This looks like fun! The new Cowboy Dressage Challenge Tests seem to add some new activities to the basic dressage tests. The dressage arena certainly looks a bit different.

Does anyone know if this equestrian activity is being done anywhere in and around Tulsa, Oklahoma? Maybe in Claremore or Skiatook or Bixby?

Please make a comment and let us know!

Do you even know what dressage is?

When I was doing it my friends who came to dressage from riding in a Western saddle seemed to “get it” much more quickly than those of us who had come from a fox hunting or hunter-jumper backgound. That’s because cowboys ride more upright, centered over the horse’s center of gravity when riding “on the flat.” A jumping saddle pitches you a bit more forward so that you can be in a better position going over fences.

Are you looking for a farm or ranch with a dressage arena?

Or do you just want a roping arena?

Or perhaps you need a cutting pen?

Whatever equine discipline you enjoy, there’s a place just right for you and your horse in and around Tulsa, Oklahoma.

If you own a ranch or a horse farm near Tulsa and are interested in moving elsewhere or moving to midtown Tulsa or even hanging up your spurs, please call me. I’d love to position your Tulsa area horse property in both the Tulsa real estate market and in the Grand Lake real estate market.

Call or text Debbie Solano at 918-724-8201.

Shortlink: http://oklahomahorseproperties.com/?p=1241

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Copyright© 2013 by Debbie Solano — ALL RIGHTS RESERVED — Oklahoma Horse Properties — The New Cowboy Dressage Challenge Tests

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I confess that there are few times I really want to watch TV:

    http://oklahomahorseproperties.com/blog/the-arm-chair-riders-guide-to-the-olympic-equestrian-events-883/

  • When the sky turns green and clouds start moving in opposite directions — good time to check the weather on TV
  • Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City
  • The Rose Parade in Pasadena California on New Year’s Day
  • Any televised event involving the British royal family
  • Occasional political debates involving controversial presidential candidates
  • The Olympic Equestrian Events:
    • Eventing
    • Dressage
    • Show Jumping
  • Women’s Gymnastics
  • Figure Skating
  • Ice Dancing

That’s it! End of Story! The truth is that I am a TV addict. If I had cable television I would never get anything done. I’d be glued to the tube all day long — just like I am glued to my computer screen.

So now that I am divorced and there is nobody telling me I cannot watch my favorite events on television (because they are too “boring!” — Hah! Don’t get me started….), I now really want to find a sports bar somewhere and watch the Olympic Equestrian Events on TV. Even if I did find a sports bar somewhere I’d be forced to watch track and field events, basketball, soccer, or anything other than what I want to see.

So last night I was pleased to discover that the Admin at Barnmice had posted her favorite links to the London 2012 Equestrian Events. I can follow the links and at least drool over the still pictures and occasional video feeds.

All the fun started yesterday with Eventing. It will finish up on August 9th with Dressage Grand Prix Freestyle to Music — my absolute favorite event. One of my goals in life is to participate in just such an event. It may take me a long time, but by golly I’m going to get there… once I get off my touchie, get away from the computer and start riding again. Enough said…

Here are the best links to the London 2012 Olympics Equestrian Events:

The best way to watch the Equestrian Events is to log into YouTube and google London 2012 Equestrian Events followed by the event or rider you want to watch and you’ll find lots to watch. I’ll post my faves on Twitter as I find good videos too. Follow me @dsolano.

Shortlink:  http://oklahomahorseproperties.com/?p=883

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Copyright© 2012 by Debbie Solano — ALL RIGHTS RESERVED — Oklahoma Horse Properties — The Arm Chair Rider’s Guide to the Olympic Equestrian Events

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This historic little country house in rural Oklahoma is situated on 6-acres on a paved road in Mayes County, Oklahoma (in Adair, OK). It sold quickly — within two weeks of my listing it. 

Historic little country house in rural Oklahoma, Adair, OK in Mayes County

Historic little country house in rural Oklahoma, Adair, OK in Mayes County

How did this historic little country house in rural Oklahoma, a full hour from Tulsa, sell so quickly?

Some people would say it’s in the middle of nowhere.  I like to think that it’s convenient to everywhere, northwest of Adair, northeast of Claremore, east of Foyil, southeast of Chelsea, south of Vinita, southwest of Big Cabin.  How did this historic little country house in rural Oklahoma (on 6-acres in Adair) sell so quickly?

The buyer found this hisoric little country house quickly because she was looking for a small equine property and this one was priced right. I met the REALTOR® with her buyer to show the advantages of this historic little country house in rural Oklahoma:

  1.  Built in 1914, this historic little country house in rural Oklahoma is still standing after 98 years.  You just cannot say that about many homes in northeast Oklahoma.  We only became a state in 1907, and so to find a home built in 1914 that is still livable, updated, energy efficient, cute as a button, and capable of supporting a small horse training business with a reasonable price is pretty unique.  Just the fact that it hasn’t blown away in a hundred years is amazing.  It’s obviously in a good spot.
  2. It has high ceilings and two chimneys where wood stoves can be installed.
  3. It’s got those wonderful 1″ x 12″ baseboards that protect the plaster and lathe walls.
  4. It’s got extra insulation in the walls, in the attic, and under the floor.
  5. It has a beautifully updated kitchen that overlooks the five-acre horse pasture.  The kitchen appliances are energy efficient and the cabinets are high-quaility hickory wood cabinets with dovetail corners made by Kraft Maid.  The drawers glide smoothly.
  6. It has a Bosch tankless hot water heater.
  7. It has a new, energy-efficient furnace in the attic.
  8. It has insulated replacement windows.
  9. It has insulated steel exterior doors.
  10. The rooms seem large because of the high ceilings.
  11. It’s been rewired and replumbed.
  12. It’s got an old barn with a fraidy hole on the east side that could also be used to store garden implements.
  13. There’s a great little site for a garden plot near the little creek that crosses the property.
  14. It has three water sources:  rural water, a hand-dug well that’s begging for a little roof and a bucket to become a “wishing well,” and a thousand-gallon cistern located to collect rain water from the roof.
  15. This little pioneer house stood out in the Oklahoma countryside when it’s original family needed to be self-sufficient.

Why did this historic little country house rural Oklahoma (Adair, OK) sell so quickly?  Here’s the main reason:  My sellers did everything I asked them to do.  They were amazing.

  1. They priced it to sell.  They hired an appraiser and had a professional opinion as to the home’s value.  Then they priced it at the appraisal value rather than playing games.
  2. I showed them the competition.  Together we studied the market and realized that there was only a 5 percent chance of selling the house within 30 days.  We had a contract within 16 days.  My sellers knew that they had to go where the buyers were.  Since you cannot move the house, they decided to move the price to a point at which the house would be affordable and desirable.
  3. They made repairs and a few cosmetic changes.
  4. They put a full home warranty on the house that will cover the sellers and the buyer through the first year:  the AHS Flex-Plan Combo.
  5. They were willing to pay the buyer’s closing costs so that she could obtain an RDA loan.

How did this historic little country house in rural Oklahoma sell so quickly?  They buyer loves it and the sellers want to sell it.

Why did this historic little country house in rural Oklahoma sell so quickly?  Opportunity met preparedness, i.e., we were lucky.

Now I’ve got to find another just like it with fabulous pasture at an affordable price within an hour of Tulsa, because there are more buyers looking for similar horse properties.  Here’s what they just missed.

Click here to watch the Obeo Virtual Tour of this fabulous little horse property in Adair featuring an historic little Country House in rural Oklahoma on 6 Acres

Shortlink:  http://oklahomahorseproperties.com/?p=248

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Copyright© 2012 by Debbie Solano — ALL RIGHTS RESERVED — Oklahoma Horse Properties — This Historic Little Country House in Rural Oklahoma Sold Quickly

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Several months back I posted an article on OKLandandRanches.com called What is Land? A Judaeo-Christian Theological Perspective

I have given myself permission to reblog that post and entitle it A Biblical Perspective on Land — Land from the Bible’s Point of View. You might be asking what that has to do with Oklahoma horse properties. Let’s just get that out of the way.

Land in Northeast Oklahoma is perfect for raising and training horsesIf you live in Oklahoma, there’s a good chance you own land, own a Bible, and have seen a horse, owned a horse, fed a horse, ridden a horse, and perhaps even trained a horse. You’re quite likely a Bible quoting, horse-back riding landowner. Or you may just wish you owned a piece of land that you could turn into a cattle ranch or horse farm. So that’s why this post can end up on a blog called Oklahoma Horse Properties.

There’s no better place to meditate, pray, and ponder God’s creation than from the back of a horse. Period. End of story. Watching sheep and goats on a farm has given me wonderful insight into the mindset of the Biblical writers who interpreted God’s love for us in terms of His covenant faithfulness to us as his flock. However, most of my best pondering about theology has come to me while riding in the woods. That’s just the way it’s happened for me.

So let’s begin.

Is land the same everywhere? Is land different in Oklahoma from other places?

Can land be bought and sold? If so, when we buy land and sell land, what is it that we are exchanging?

Theologians, lawyers, real estate agents, farmers, geologists, accountants, and sailors all have varying perspectives on what land is.

Today, I will examine the question, “What is land?” from a Judaeo-Christian theological perspective. What does The Bible say about land? What does the book of Genesis say about land?

What is the Biblical perspective on land? What is land from the point of view of the Bible?

Land in the Judaeo-Christian Biblical Tradition

The Preamble to Genesis describes the Creation of the World.

“In the beginning” of the Bible, “when God created the heavens and the earth” there was nothing but chaos, or what the Hebrew text calls the “tohu wa bohu” the traditional translation for which is “formless void.”

The newly revised New American Bible Old Testament (NAB. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011) says:

– and the earth was without form or shape, with darkness over the abyss and a mighty wind sweeping over the waters –

Hence, there was no land “in the beginning.”

The Preamble lists the generations of the heavens and the earth. The Preamble to Genesis (Genesis 1:1-2:3) is a cosmological toledoth or genealogical list of the generations of the heavens and the earth, the birth order of the cosmos, or what came before history. This is the Priestly order of creation, just as the other lists of Genesis give us the birth order of human beings, the generations of humankind, followed by the toledoths of the patriarchs.

A serious student of The Bible is aware of the various strands of authorship that were woven together to form the final Biblical text. Even in third grade when I first began reading The Bible I noticed that the order of creation varies between Chapter 1 and Chapter 2 of Genesis.

Biblical scholars recognize that this Preamble of Genesis comes from the Priestly source (P) and is the first of the toledoths or series of genealogical lists that make up the structure of the primordial history (Genesis 1-11), which takes the reader from creation to the appearance of Abraham and the beginning of historical documentation in Genesis Chapter 12.

When the Redactor (R) of the primordial history put that part of the Bible together, he carefully, respectfully, and reverently combined the Priestly lists with the Yahwistic stories (the J stories from the southern kingdom of Judea which referred to God by the ineffable tetragrammaton, YHWH, translated into English texts as LORD and traditionally printed in small caps. This Yahwistic strand had probably already been flavored by a few Elohistic (E) elements (the strands or snippets from the northern kingdom of Israel whch referred to God with the word “elohim,” the Hebrew plural form of the word “God”). This northern Elohistic strand may have combined with the southern Yahwistic tradition after the fall of the northern kingdom of Israel around 620 BCE and the dispersal of its inhabitants, but prior to the the exportation of the southern kingdom to Babylon in 597 BCE.

The Bible Teaches Us through Brain Switching

On the one hand, the Priestly toledoths give structure to the Biblical text as bones of the human body provide structure and hold the body together.

On the other hand, the Yahwistic/Elohistic stories are like the organs of the human body, each having a specific theological teaching task to illustrate Biblical truths.

We enjoy reading the stories and find those easier to remember because they light up a different part of our brain.

We use a different part of our brain to memorize the items in a list.

Together these two elements are interchanged in a way that teachers call “brain switching.”

The beauty of the structure of the primordial history is that the brain switching from the left brain, sequential lists of the Priestly source, to the right brain, global stories of the Yahwist makes the entire text move quickly through the actual passage of a long period of geological time.

When teaching classes about the Bible, I always ask my students to think of a parade. What is the first thing that happens in a parade? You hear the drum beat of the first marching band. The drum creates rhythm. The bands help the whole parade march through both time and space.

The Priestly toledoths, or sequential lists are like the bands in a parade — orderly, rhythmic, mathematical — stimulating learning with our left brain.

The Yahwistic stories are like the floats in the parade — the whimsical interpretive elements of the parade — the meat and potatoes — stimulating learning with our right brain.

Sofia Cavaletti’s Catechesis of the Good Shepherd Level I curriculum illustrates this primordial history beautifully with the blue ribbon of the “fetuccia” and “fettucina” illustrating the long period of time which elapsed prior to the emergence of animals, which are introduced by the switch to a beige ribbon and followed by the appearance of human beings as “co-creators with God,” illustrated by a human hand embroidered on the beige ribbon. In this pre-school Montessori curriculum, three-year olds are introduced to geological time by walking with their catechist as she unwinds the 80-meter ribbon and introduces the children to the concept of salvation history.

Land is one of the items written in Old English script on a blue placard which the catechist places on the floor as she walks down the hallway with the children unwinding the gros-grain ribbon of salvation history, the Fettucia.  God created land through the act of separation on the third day.

Then God said: Let the water under the sky be gathered into a single basin, so that the dry land may appear. And so it happened: the water under the sky was gathered into its basin, and the dry land appeared. God called the dry land “earth,” and the basin of water he called “sea.” God saw that it was good. Then God said: Let the earth bring forth vegetation: every kind of plant that bears seed and every kind of fruit tree on earth that bears fruit with its seed in it. And so it happened: the earth brought forth vegetation: every kind of plant that bears seed and every kind of fruit tree that bears fruit with its seed in it. God saw that it was good. Evening came, and morning followed — the third day. (NAB, Genesis 1:9-13)

The notes to the New American Bible point out that the literary structure of six days relates the creation events of the first three days in a parallel way to the creation events of the second three days.

light (day) / darkness (night)         =           4. sun / moon

arrangement of water         =           5. fish + birds from waters

a) dry land b) vegetation         =           6. a) animals b) human beings: male / female

This parallelism between the creation of dry land and the creation of human beings is less apparent in English than it is in Hebrew. In Genesis 2:7 the Yahwist tells us:

then the Lord God formed the man out of the dust of the ground and blew into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living being.

The Hebrew word used is the same verb that is used when a potter throws clay on a potter’s wheel and shapes a pot. Hence, the notes to the NAB instruct us:

God is portrayed as a potter molding the human body out of earth. There is a play on words in Hebrew between ‘adam (“human being,” “man”) and ‘adama (“ground”). It is not enough to make the body from earth; God must also breathe into the man’s nostrils.

The Abrahamic Covenant Promised Abraham Land and Descendants.

In the Yahwist’s (J) version of the Abrahamic covenant with God, the promise of a son and heir is given in Genesis 15:1-6, followed by the promise of land in Genesis 15:7-21:

He then said to him: I am the LORD who brought you from Ur of the Chaldeans to give you this land as a possession. “Lord GOD,” he asked, “how will I know that I will possess it?”(NAB)

In the Priestly (P) tradition of the same story, Abram’s name is changed to Abraham after God promises him many descendants. After that, God promises land in Genesis 17:8:

I will give to you and to your descendants after you the land in which you are now residing as aliens, the whole land of Canaan, as a permanent possession; and I will be their God.

There’s a catch, however, in Genesis 17:9:

God said to Abraham: for your part, you and your descendants after you must keep my covenant throughout the ages. This is the covenant between me and you and your descendants after you that you must keep: every male among you shall be circumcised.

Oops! Imagine your mortgage lender making that requirement of a home buyer today! Ouch!

Circumcision was a sign of the Abrahamic covenant (just as the rainbow was the sign of the Noachic covenant).

God promised that he would give the Hebrew people the land of Canaan and that he would be their God.

Modern-day political problems exist because both Muslims and Jews cite this scripture as part of their claim to the land of Palestine, since Abraham’s illegitimate son Ishmael was the ancestor of the Arabs and Abraham’s son Isaac was the ancestor of the Jews.

Land has been fought over for thousands of years.

Much of the Old Testament is concerned with the conquering of land and possessing the land.

One of the punishments of disobedience was losing the land.

In one of David Noel Freedman’s last treastises, which he called The Nine Commandments, he explained that The Bible was put together in response to the question posed by the exiled Jews, “How did we lose the land and end up in Babylon?” It’s one of my favorite books. It’s an especially important book for Protestants and Catholics to read to understand how the Ten Commandments have been numbered differently. Put this book on you “must read” list.

David Noel Freedman was a scholar who can see the entire forest because he is able to examine each and every tree.

In case you never heard of David Noel Freedman, here is a video you can watch:

http://oklahomahorseproperties.com/?p=126

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Copyright© 2012 by Debbie Solano — ALL RIGHTS RESERVED — Oklahoma Horse Properties — What is Land? A Judaeo-Christian Theological Perspective

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This wonderful property has been sold, but we can show you other beautiful parcels of vacant land. Call Debbie Solano at 918-724-8201.

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Today I’d like to tell you about 20 acres of beautiful vacant land that Gay Downing and I have co-listed on Highway 16 in Okmulgee County.  Although the street address shows that the property is in Beggs, OK (zip code 74421), the property is in Preston Schools (Preston Public School District).

This land is comprised of a parcel measuring approximately 1,320 feet of Highway 16 frontage by 660 feet of frontage on 220 Road in Okmulgee County.  The property is just a mile east of Highway 75 and so it has easy access to downtown Tulsa.  Of course, Highway 16 is a paved road.  I estimate that the driving time to downtown Tulsa from this vacant land would be 30 minutes to 45 minutes depending on traffic conditions and the weight of the driver’s foot on the gas pedal.

The legal description describes 20 acres, some of which is most probably taken up by the right-of-ways for Highway 16 and 220 Road.  A buyer can have the property surveyed to determine the exact amount of usable land.

What I like most about this property is that there is a small creek that cuts across the land diagonally on the south side.  There are dense woods around the creek, thereby offering  a nice buffer from road noise.

The property is best accessed from the west side of the creek, where the land is high and you can easily access the back part of the property where there are lovely pastures and small glades of woods, meadows, and clusters of mature trees.   Here is a topo and Google Earth aerial to give you an idea of the lay of the land.

I walked this land with a petroleum engineer.  There is no current oil and gas production on this land, nor is there evidence that anyone has ever drilled for oil & gas on this land.  (There is a cased hole in the parcel to the north of this property, but there is no apparent production activity going on there.  There are some electrical lines on the parcel to the north indicative that at one time someone had had an oil and gas lease there).  Again, there are no wells nor evidence of any oil and gas activity on the subject property.

The neighbor seems to have been running his cows on this land and they have kept the underbrush from growing up.  There is no fence across the north border and the west fence is broken by two gates where the cows wander in.

This property would make a lovely home site for someone who desired easy access to Tulsa with privacy and seclusion with good pasture for horses.

There is plenty of level land for arenas and barns.  The creek along the south end of the property provides the possibility of digging a pond, if a buyer were to desire going through that expense and effort.

For more information about this property, please contact

Gay Downing at 918-645-7488 or Debbie Solano at 9198-712-4473.  

We're sorry, but we couldn't find MLS # 1114948 in our database. This property may be a new listing or possibly taken off the market. Please check back again.

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Debbie Solano, CRS, Tulsa REALTOR® specializing in land, farms, and ranches

Debbie Solano, CRS, midtown Tulsa REALTOR® for Coldwell Banker Select — Land & Ranch Division, Real Estate Broker Associate specializing in selling and marketing country estates, horse properties, cattle ranches, equestrian properties, land, farms, and homes of every kind throughout Tulsa and Northeast Oklahoma. (edit)

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